So what is my example e-bike in California?  Looking the section for motorized bicycle, it’s less than 1000W, check.  It’s capable of 23-MPH, fail.  We talked earlier about how to make it pass in Texas, and the same things could get it to pass in California. But the last one is new, “Incapable of increasing the speed past 20-MPH…”  What does that mean?  It does not seem to me that it means you can’t motor to 20-MPH, then pedal to go faster.  It’s the opposite.  It means that if you pedal to 20-MPH, the motor won’t add any more speed than you have from pedaling. The example e-bike does not do that, so check.

Our powerful mid-drive motor will help you conquer virtually any hill. We’ve located the motor in the middle of the frame, close to the center of gravity, improving stability and handling. With both pedal-assist and full throttle at your fingertips, you are in complete control.

The Surprising Health Benefits of an Electric Bike by Gretchen Reynolds. The New York Times, July 6, 2016. Electric bikes can encourage motorists back onto two wheels, with real benefits to their health.

The foundation for a higher level of performance is made possible by the new generation of 3C discharge cells. Each cell is better able to deliver more power and maintain higher speeds throughout the entire discharge cycle.

An Electric Boost for Bicyclists by J. David Goodman. The New York Times, January 31, 2010. There are over 120 million electric bicycles in China, and now Chinese makers have got behind the technology, they are driving growth in other world markets.

Like electric cars, electric bikes are pricey. A basic e-bike can be had for as little as $499 on Amazon, but sturdy, well-designed models with better-quality batteries cost between $2,000 and $3,500. (Conventional bikes sell for an average of about $450 in speciality stores and about $100 in retailers like Walmart and Target where most bikes are sold.) Prices could come down as batteries and electric motors become more efficient, and economies of scale come into play. “The technology is getting better, rapidly,” says Dave Hurst of Navigant.

In this chapter, it tells you how to operate the bicycle or in this case e-bicycle.  In most cases, there is little variation in this area from state to state.  All the usual stuff about having at least one hand on the handlebars, having a light at night, riding as far to the right as can be done safely, etc.  In nearly all states, it will clearly state that bikes obey traffic laws, such as speed limits, stop signs etc.  Just because you are allowed 20-MPH on the ebike you can’t ride though the 15-MPH school zone at 20-MPH.  You’d think this would be pretty obvious, but far too many bike riders think that no license required means no laws apply.  It’s not the case.  But it’s true that cops may ignore your breaking the law on a bicycle. Or…they may not.  Do you feel lucky?

Light weight design, easy to transport; Eco friendly and safe to use. High quality and long life expectancy; Stored in a sturdy aluminum casing. User friendly and come with holder and charger. Click for Full Description.

The industry is benefiting from improved batteries as suppliers over the years developed technology for laptops, smartphones and electric cars. In 2004, lithium ion battery prices fell low enough to be used on electric bikes, spurring European sales, according to Edward Benjamin, senior managing director at eCycleElectric Consulting.

The Smart Motion Catalyst is an e-bike we enjoyed riding. It had the right feel for under $3,000. It is a high-speed trail e-bike with cadence and torque sensing assist options. It has a welcome trigger throttle for maximum power override, and that is something we love. Here’s another review of the Smart Motion Catalyst on EBR until we do ours.

A lightweight, high speed, electric road bike with sturdy 12 mm thru-axle on the front wheel, Carbon fiber fork, and Alpha 200 Gold alloy frame to dampen vibration. Capable and comfortable on hard packed trails as a gravel grinder, sturdy Aluminum fenders and……

“You honestly feel like you’re floating,” said Marino, who found pedaling easy for his recovering leg. “I felt like I was riding horses again. Instead of trails, I was road biking in and out of traffic.”

I have put over 200 miles on my EVELO in the past few weeks. Nothing but fun. And more fun! After 25 miles on pedal assist I still have over half a battery charge left. Hills become flat. I have been riding on pavement, dirt roads, and trails in the forest. Riding a regular bike is quite a bit of work in hilly areas like where I live. My EVELO makes riding fun.

The Townie® is the perfect run-around-town bike for riding to the farmer’s market, grabbing a coffee or just rolling around the neighborhood. With an upright riding position that lets you see the world better and the ability to place your feet flat on the ground whenever you want, our Townie collection sets the standard in comfort and control.

“This is the beginning of a multi-year shift away from regular pedal to electric bikes,” Jump Bikes CEO Ryan Rzepecki told CNN Tech. “When people first jump on an ebike, their face lights up. It’s exciting and joyful in a way that you don’t get from a regular bike.”

The part that confuses me is the “saddle”. Recumbent trikes do not have the typical bicycle saddle seat. They have a nice comfy fully supportive seat. Some are like bucket seats. So then I’m thinking, would it be a moped under WA law?

We believe that only our riders should control the power and speed of our Electric Bicycles, so all of our bikes are throttle controlled. We believe that controlling the speed and brakes on a bicycle are intuitively linked as an extension of the hand.

The oldest patent for an electric bike I’ve been able to find at the US Patent and Trademark Office is this one, by Ogden Bolton, Jr. of Canton Ohio, which was filed in September 1895 and granted three months later. You can see from these original diagrams that it bears an amazingly close resemblance to modern electric bikes. In the general picture on the left, you can see there’s a hub motor on the rear wheel (blue), a battery suspended from the frame (red), and a simple handlebar control to make the thing stop and go. In the more detailed cutaway of the hub motor on the right, you can see there’s a six-pole magnet in the center (orange) bolted to the frame and an armature (made from coiled wire, yellow) that rotates around it when the current is switched on. It’s quite a hefty motor even by modern standards; Ogdon mentions “a heavy current at low voltage—for instance, to carry one hundred amperes at ten volts.” So that’s 1000 watts, which is about twice the power of a typical modern bike hub motor.

And let’s not forget the economic advantages of owning an e-bike. The annual cost of running a new family car is, on average, about $9,000 per year. Running an electric bike costs around $400 per year. And while filling a gas tank costs around $30, recharging an electric bike battery costs only about 50 cents. A tank of gas may get you further, but not 60 times further!

In a parallel hybrid motorized bicycle, such as the aforementioned 1897 invention by Hosea W. Libbey, human and motor inputs are mechanically coupled either in the bottom bracket, the rear wheel, or the front wheel, whereas in a (mechanical) series hybrid cycle, the human and motor inputs are coupled through differential gearing. In an (electronic) series hybrid cycle, human power is converted into electricity and is fed directly into the motor and mostly additional electricity is supplied from a battery.