Thanks for helping a little Southern California startup become a global company. A company that can not just hang with the big boys, but lead the way. Thanks for helping us stay true to our roots. For embracing innovation. For realizing that style and substance aren’t mutually exclusive.

 Looks pretty similar to the Texas definitions, but there is one key difference.  There is no definition for electric bike. There seems to be no such thing as an electric bike in New Mexico. The closest match is “moped” So it looks like in the State of New Mexico the example e-bike is a moped.  Some good news, you can go 30 mph. And you don’t need to register and insure a moped.

A folding electric bike designed to be durable and water resistant, cast rims can handle more weight and won’t go out of true, stainless steel hardware won’t rust. Feature complete with fenders, a sturdy rear rack, larger reflective tires and LED lights, you……

The Eurpopeans have it right. Pedelecs are the way to go. I have a Kalkoff. I find it so effortless to pedal that I only need to use the Eco assist level. The only time I use the standard or high assist levels are when climbing 8-10 degree hills. Because pedaling with assist is so effortless, having a throttle is redundant.

Lower the voltage.  Depending on the battery, the first block or two of riding might do the trick.  If your battery drops voltage fast, you might be a lot slower than 20-MPH for 98% of your ride. I’d call that close enough if that is the case.  Or maybe I can just charge my battery to a lower voltage.  Maybe if I charge it to 40 volts instead of the normal 42V-44V, I won’t be quite so fast.  That could work if my battery still gets me going 23-MPH for too long to fudge it.

A recent report from the consulting firm eCycleElectric said that approximately 250,000 e-bikes were sold in America last year, representing 70% growth over 2015. Other estimates suggest the business could double again this year.

Continue reading subsection D. It only applies to state laws that are “more stringent than the Federal law or requirements referred to in subsection A” — then go back to subsection A and see if it says anything at all about the operation of e-bikes. It does not. It only refers to 16 CFR 1500.18 – (“Banned toys and other banned articles intended for use by children.”) and 16 CFR Part 1512 (“REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES”), which has such thrilling subsections as “Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig” and “Toe Clearance and Chain Guard Requirements” but says absolutely nothing about what types of roads or paths e-bikes are allowed to be operated upon, etc.

You gotta be kidding. What’s the point of having the bike if I have to slow down to a walking pace to avoid some idiotic, brainless move? I’ll just trade it in for a rusty Schwinn and then stop biking altogether because that’s stupid.

Electric bicycle (e-bike) laws are different in every state, and can be confusing for consumers, retailers, and suppliers. The Bicycle Product Suppliers Association and PeopleForBikes have a partnership to make riding an e-bike easy and accessible for all.

High Performance, Eco Friendly 48v, 1500W E-bike Conversion Kit. 48V 1500W super powerful brushless gearless hub motor. Crank speed sensor for pedal assist. This E Bike Conversion Kit includes everything you need (except battery and charger) to convert your mechanical bike into a 3 mode electric bike.

As of August 1st, 2015, every E-BikeKit and E-TrikeKit will now include a set (8 x guides and 14 x zip ties) of Flexroute Guides and Cobra zip ties. These items are being added at no additional charge. Packs of these guides and specialty zips are also available for sale in our online shop.

Eric has been involved in the electric bike industry since 2002 when he started a 6000 square foot brick and mortar Electric Bike store in downtown San Francisco. He is a true believer that small electric vehicles can change the way we operate and the way we think.

The oldest patent for an electric bike I’ve been able to find at the US Patent and Trademark Office is this one, by Ogden Bolton, Jr. of Canton Ohio, which was filed in September 1895 and granted three months later. You can see from these original diagrams that it bears an amazingly close resemblance to modern electric bikes. In the general picture on the left, you can see there’s a hub motor on the rear wheel (blue), a battery suspended from the frame (red), and a simple handlebar control to make the thing stop and go. In the more detailed cutaway of the hub motor on the right, you can see there’s a six-pole magnet in the center (orange) bolted to the frame and an armature (made from coiled wire, yellow) that rotates around it when the current is switched on. It’s quite a hefty motor even by modern standards; Ogdon mentions “a heavy current at low voltage—for instance, to carry one hundred amperes at ten volts.” So that’s 1000 watts, which is about twice the power of a typical modern bike hub motor.

Some individuals have lost considerable amounts of weight by using an electric bike.[60] By making the biking terrain less of an issue, people wouldn’t otherwise consider biking can use the electric assistance when needed and otherwise pedal as they are able.[61] This means people of lower fitness levels or who haven’t cycled in many years can start enjoying the many health benefits E-bikes have to offer. [1]