This aluminum commuter bike is all business, but it’s one of the most versatile e-bikes available. With a Bosch Performance Speed motor housed around the bottom bracket, the center of balance is lower for stability, comfort, and control, even at speeds up to 28 miles per hour. It makes errands easier and won’t stand out when locked in front of a building, thanks to a low-key, matte black paint scheme. And if you ride at night, Super Nova headlights illuminate your way for safety at high speeds.

Interestingly, it appears that if I wanted to, I could also ride it as a moped. In the example, 36V makes it go 23-MPH.  With 48V, it would go about 28-MPH, and have about one and a half horsepower.  As a moped, note that it does not require the bike to have pedals.  As a motorized bicycle, it IS required to have fully operable pedals.

This is the display of the Easy Motion Neo Jumper electric mountain bike.  The pedal assist settings can be adjusted up or down using the + or – buttons on the left side of the display.  In this picture the pedal assist is set to the highest level; see the right side of the display.

Automated Transit Networks (ATN), and the small-vehicle subset of Personal Rapid Transit (PRT), are emerging technologies that can help solve the related problems of congestion, dependence on foreign oil, and planetary climate disruption. ATN/PRT offers clean, quiet, responsive public transit with automated non-stop service available 24 hours a day. In addition to these service benefits, PRT costs far less to build and operate than other transit options ¯ and is safer than walking and cycling on nearby busy streets.

Battery-electric locomotive Battery electric vehicle Cater MetroTrolley Electric aircraft Electric bicycle Pedelec Electric boat Electric bus Battery electric bus Electric car Electric truck Electric platform truck Electric vehicle Electric motorcycles and scooters Electric kick scooter Gyro flywheel locomotive Hybrid electric vehicle Hybrid train Motorized bicycle Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Plug-in electric vehicle Plug-in hybrid electric vehicle Solar vehicle Solar car Solar bus

An Electric Boost for Bicyclists by J. David Goodman. The New York Times, January 31, 2010. There are over 120 million electric bicycles in China, and now Chinese makers have got behind the technology, they are driving growth in other world markets.

A value-priced urban electric bike that includes fenders, integrated LED lights, a rear rack, and hydraulic disc brakes, it’s available in three frame sizes but only high-step. This is a high-speed Class 3 ebike that can reach ~28 mph assisted and because……

Baby boomers are an obvious market for electric bicycles. “We’re seeing an aging population, and a growing number of people getting back into cycling,” says Bill Moore, an Internet publisher who recently launched ePEDALER, an electric-assist bicycle retailer. Urbanization will be another driver of electric bike sales, Moore said, as will the obesity crisis, rising health care costs, and the desires of employers to encourage their workers to become more active.

Before explaining why, let’s make clear what we mean by an electric bicycle. These are not mopeds or motorcycles, but bicycles that can be pedaled with or without an assist from an electric motor. They’re sometimes called “pedelecs” or “pedal assist” bicycles because in Europe the boost from the motor only kicks in if you pedal; in the U.S., most e-bicycles also come equipped with a throttle to turn on the motor without any pedaling required. Riding an electric bike feels a bit like riding a conventional bike with a brisk wind at your back; the motor helps you go faster and climb hills, but it’s not the primary source of propulsion. Unlike mopeds or electric scooters, e-bicycles are typically permitted on bike paths, and they can’t travel faster than 20 mph.

Full-power: These bikes are designed for minimal pedaling over relatively short distances. They have large batteries and powerful hub motors and they tend to be big, sturdy, and heavy. Bikes like this are for people who love cycling but hate pedaling! Since you’re using power all the time, the range is limited (typically 16–30km or 10–20 miles).

We easily rode 30 e-bikes or more this year. Almost all of them impressed us one way or another. Some are expensive and others more affordable. As with most expensive e-bikes, you pay for the difference in quality and feel. But not all entry-level e-bikes have to feel like a cheesy attempt to convert a heavy regular bike with a battery pack and an electric motor.

Power-assist: Also known as pedal-assist bikes, these are the bicycle equivalents of hybrid cars: they’re designed to be pedaled quite a lot of the time and electrically powered either when you’re tired or when you feel like a bit of electric help (when you’re going up hill, for example). Unlike full-power bikes, they don’t have hub motors; instead, there’s a separate electric motor mounted near the rear wheel and driving it either through the gear sprocket or simply by pressing against the rear tire. Where a hub motor is difficult or impossible to pedal without any power (because you’re effectively turning it into a generator), power-assist motors turn easily with little or no resistance when you pedal. That gives power-assist bikes much greater range than hub-motor ones (as much as 80–145km or 50–90 miles).

Shipped but unopened box is returnable within 30 days after ship. There is a  20% restocking fee, customer pays shipping both ways. To be eligible for a return, your be returned in an unopened box and in the same package and condition that you received it.

BEST e-bike kit is composed by two main parts: our drive unit ( aka motor ) and the battery. It comes with all the additional items you’ll need to convert your bike, such as two crankarms, torque arm for fixing the Drive Unit to the bike, throttle, battery holder, battery charger, controller.

Jump up ^ PikeResearch (2010-06-10). “Electric Bicycles, Motorcycles, and Scooters to Gain Increasing Acceptance Worldwide”. PikeResearch. Archived from the original on 2010-06-15. Retrieved 2010-06-12.

The GenZe app works through Bluetooth connection on the 200 series e-Bikes only. The app can be used to understand range and battery life, plan routes, track ride history, and measure exertion. The 200 series e-Bikes also come with a phone mount and integrated USB charger to keep you charged and connected while you ride.

You Can Go Long(ish): E-bikes are great for commuting and even some long-distance travel. Consider this: a car can travel about 289 miles on a tank of gas (assuming an average of 24.1 miles per gallon for a 2015 model year car). Extracycles go 18-60 miles per charge, and a fully charged Elby e-bike can go 95 miles on gentle terrain. (Some e-bikes even have ranges greater than electric cars like the Nissan Leaf and the BMW i3.)

One of the most powerful, fastest accelerating, quietest, and beautifully designed electric bikes I have ever tested, premium drivetrain and custom battery. Surprisingly lightweight and well balanced front to rear considering the large 750 watt hub motor,……

“Traditionally, people don’t use bikes for transportation,” says Larry Pizzi, the president of Currie Technologies, a leading e-bicyle manufacturer based in Simi Valley, California. “We’re trying to change a paradigm.” There are reasons to believe that the e-bicycle industry may be able to do just that.

  Don’t just trust what a person that wants to sell you an e-bike says. There is no substitute for digging up the law in your own state to figure out if what you plan to buy, or have bought is legal for you to ride in your state.

Some power-on-demand only e-bikes can hardly be confused with, let alone categorised as, bicycles. For example, the Noped is a term used by the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario for e-bikes which do not have pedals or in which the pedals have been removed from their motorised bicycle. These are better categorised as electric mopeds or electric motorcycles.

This all-black e-bike looks futuristic in design, from the handlebars to the Shimano Alfine drivetrain, and its tech is pretty far ahead, too. This Contro-E has Cannondale’s classic Lefty fork (a rigid one) and 2.35-inch Schwalbe tires hefty enough to do urban battle with potholes and the occasional shards of glass. Full front and rear fenders make it a rainy day machine, and a Bosch engine gives you a bit of boost when your morning coffee hasn’t yet kicked in during your commute. 

A lightweight, high speed, electric road bike with sturdy 12 mm thru-axle on the front wheel, Carbon fiber fork, and Alpha 200 Gold alloy frame to dampen vibration. Capable and comfortable on hard packed trails as a gravel grinder, sturdy Aluminum fenders and……

Pennsylvania is one of the states where non-ebikers who shouldn’t get involved are anyway. Let me explain why they look foolish for trying to control what they don’t even understand. PA vehicle code states 5 “requirements” or criterion which are critical to legal ebikes. the 3rd states in order for it to be a motor vehicle (not a bike) it MUST have an automatic transmission. Even though the code had the term “electric bike” added to it, it still left the “automatic transmission” requirement. Electric motors and bicycles don’t have automatic transmissions, and aren’t really classified in the vehicle code for that reason. Yet on Penndot’s (PA’s DMV) website there is a promiscuous “FACT SHEET” which says electric bikes are all illegal without registration and a DL. I would tell them to stop being so dumb, but I’ve noticed this approach rarely changes the ‘facts’, and I”ll just leave that nest of bees alone. I wonder who wrote that turd. Not one of us, we don’t step on our own rights, do we? I don’t even try to step on others’. But have to be careful where you step. I like laws. But they have to make sense. Ebikes are harmless and can reduce the plague of pollution to heal what I’ve seen become noticeably dirtier (waterways, snow) in my own lifespan, What a shame to even consider it being illegal.