In the geared motor, a small and lightweight motor spins very fast inside. The electric bike motor then uses a planetary reduction gear inside the motor to reduce the rpm to the correct speed for a bike wheel. Electric Bike Motor An electric bike motor on an electric bike can be any kind of electric motor. There have been some very creative home brew e bikes that used any motor…

Forward-thinking parents are giving up thier SUVs and opting for electric cargo bikes for getting the family around. Cargo bikes are seeing a resurgence in popularity with the rise of electric conversion systems that convert these awesome people movers into family toting electric vehicles. One year ago the Wall Street Journal ran a full page article in their weekend edition entitled The New Station Wagon. Since then the trend for…

Both land management regulators and mountain bike trail access advocates have argued for bans of electric bicycles on outdoor trails that are accessible to mountain bikes, citing potential safety hazards as well as the potential for electric bikes to damage trails. A study conducted by the International Mountain Bicycling Association, however, found that the physical impacts of low-powered pedal-assist electric mountain bikes may be similar to traditional mountain bikes.[65]

Like electric cars, electric bicycles are manufactured by a mix of startup companies and established players, including Schwinn, Trek, and Giant. Industry executives cite several reasons why e-bicycle sales are poised to take off in the U.S. Most important is the fact that more Americans than ever already bike to work, and that cities and towns are building infrastructure to accommodate them. According to the League of American Bicyclists, bike commuting grew by 47 percent nationally between 2000 and 2011, and it grew by 80 percent in communities designated as “bicycle friendly” by the league. Cities including New York, Chicago, Washington, and Los Angeles are building dedicated bike lanes, like those found in northern Europe, to make commuting safer and easier.

And motorcycle looking contraptions such at the Hanebrink Hustler (read article) which looks like a motorcycle and is 60-MPH  fast…will get you pulled over…even if it has pedals hidden under those fairings:

A step-thru urban electric bike that hits a sweet spot between cruiser comfort and city efficiency performance, adjustable angle stem, locking suspension fork and hydraulic disc brakes. The bike comes with fenders, a sturdy oversized rack (with standard gauge pannier rods), integrated……

Chart: Electric bicycles are rapidly becoming popular. This chart shows the growth in sales of what the manufacturers refer to as “electric power-assisted cycles (EPACs)” in European countries over the last decade. Over 1.6 million electric bikes were sold in Europe in 2016 alone, which is about 7 percent of total European bicycle sales. What this chart doesn’t reveal is that the bikes are much more popular in some countries than others: four countries accounted for 70 percent of all the sales (Germany, 36 percent; the Netherlands, 16 percent; Belgium, 10 percent; and France 8 percent). Data sourced from the report “European Bicycle Market: 2017”, courtesy of CONEBI (Confederation of the European Bicycle Industry).

A premium folding electric bike with Bosch drive system and leading warranty, sturdy and quiet with plenty of adjustability (seat post height and stem angle), smart accessories help you carry gear and stay dry without noise. The folding joints are thick and sturdy but don’t have sharp edges, both latches have……

Is my e-bike a bicycle?  It has two tandem wheels, that is, the wheels are one in front of the other, not side by side. It can be propelled by human power.  The question here is, does the law mean propelled only by human power?  It is a bit vague about that, but it does not specifically say, “cannot have a motor” either.  Hmm, maybe another definition will fit my e-bike better.  Lets read some more.

The batteries are the most important parts of the bike, because (if you don’t do any pedaling) they contain all the power that will drive you along. Typical electric bike batteries make about 350–500 W of power (that’s about 35–50 volts and 10 amps), which is about a quarter as much as you need to drive an electric toaster. In theory, you could use any kind of battery on a bicycle. In practice, however, you want to use something that stores lots of power without being too heavy—or you’ll be using half your power just moving the battery along! That tends to rule out heavy lead-acid batteries like the ones that start cars, though some electric bikes do use them. Lightweight lithium-ion batteries, similar to those used in laptop computers, mobile (cellular) phones, and MP3 players, are now the most popular choice, though they’re more expensive than older rechargeable battery technologies such as nickel-cadmium (“nicad”). Typical batteries will give your bicycle a range of 10–40 miles between charges (depending on the terrain) and a top speed of 10–20 mph (which is about the maximum most countries allow for these vehicles by law). You can extend the range by pedaling or free-wheeling some of the time.

As e-bikes became more popular, dedicated models were developed. Most of them still look very much like ordinary bicycles, but now they’re built with the motor and battery as an integral part. Today’s electric bicycles are better balanced and more efficient than ever before.

Eric has been involved in the electric bike industry since 2002 when he started a 6000 square foot brick and mortar Electric Bike store in downtown San Francisco. He is a true believer small electric vehicles can change the way we operate and the way we think.

There’s no question that electric bikes are far better for the environment than petrol-powered car engines. But that doesn’t mean they’re completely perfect. Making and disposing of batteries can be very polluting. Not only that, but an electric bicycle is still using energy that has to come from somewhere. You may think you’re using clean green power, but the electricity you use for getting about might have come from a filthy old, coal-fired power plant or one driven by nuclear energy. (If you’re lucky, of course, it might have come from solar panels or a wind turbine!) Electric bikes are nowhere near as environmentally friendly as ordinary push bikes, but nothing is ever perfect—and, as people often say, “the perfect is the enemy of the good.” Electric bikes are certainly a step in the right direction. If everyone used them to get about instead of cars, global warming might be less of a problem, and the world would be a far cleaner and healthier place!