In response to customer questions about the display, we posted a video detailing the basic setup of the LCD during installation of the kit. You will need to adjust the settings for the motor type, wheel size, and battery voltage in order to match your specific kit.  Detailed instructions are available in the E-BikeKit manual, E-TrikeKit manual and LCD Quickstart Guide

Before explaining why, let’s make clear what we mean by an electric bicycle. These are not mopeds or motorcycles, but bicycles that can be pedaled with or without an assist from an electric motor. They’re sometimes called “pedelecs” or assist” bicycles because in Europe the boost from the motor only kicks in if you pedal; in the U.S., most e-bicycles also come equipped with a throttle to turn on the motor without any pedaling required. Riding an electric bike feels a bit like riding a conventional bike with a brisk wind at your back; the motor helps you go faster and climb hills, but it’s not the primary source of propulsion. Unlike mopeds or electric scooters, e-bicycles are typically permitted on bike paths, and they can’t travel faster than 20 mph.

As the weather begins to drop and the snow starts to fall, it is increasingly important to know how to properly care for your electric bike and its Lithium-ion battery. It may be possible for some people to ride their bikes during the winter months, while others must pack them away until the warmer weather returns. Whether you plan to ride in the cold and snow or if you decide to…

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The €999 ($1,200) Kvaern bike is pedal-assist (meaning you still have to do some work) and uses a 250W motor that’s built into the frame to get up to 15 miles per hour in just a few seconds, according to the company. An integrated battery is good enough for about 30 miles of range, which also pops out for easy charging.

Electric Mountain Bikes- Just like traditional mountain bikes, these are meant to be ridden on rough and hilly terrains. They are more powerful than city e-bikes, and this enables the bikes to go over rocks and other obstacles on the trail safely.

Mid-mounted crank drives produce the most bicycle-like feel, because the pedal crank turns and drives the chain, just like when you pedal. Crank drives are efficient at transmitting power, which makes them popular, especially for fast, off-road electric bikes.

Using the throttle only, GenZe e-bikes will go about 20 miles per charge. With pedal assist, the range extends to 20-40 miles per charge. Range is affected by the weight of the rider, the type of terrain, and frequent stops and starts. Did you know that the average commute is less than 8 miles a day?

Photo: Could solar power be the future of electric bicycles? The large solar panel mounted over the back wheel of this experimental bike powers an electric motor connected by a chain drive to the back wheel, helping the rider when he doesn’t feel like pedaling. Using clean, green solar power would remove the problem of having to charge electric bikes with electricity generated from fossil fuels—and help to extend their range significantly. Photo by Warren Gretz courtesy of US DOE/NREL.

They Eliminate Much of the Heavy Lifting: Many e-bikes let you haul a load sweat-free. For example, Extracycles’ Bosch Electric Assist system helps you maintain an average speed of 15 mph, even when you’re bike is loaded with 400 pounds’ worth of rider and gear.

More powerful pedelecs which are not legally classed as bicycles are dubbed S-Pedelecs (short for Schnell-Pedelecs, i.e. Speedy-Pedelecs) in Germany. These have a motor more powerful than 250 watts and less limited, or unlimited, pedal-assist, i.e. the motor does not stop assisting the rider once 25 km/h has been reached. S-Pedelec class e-bikes are therefore usually classified as mopeds or motorcycles rather than as bicycles and therefore may (depending on the jurisdiction) need to be registered and insured, the rider may need some sort of driver’s license (either car or motorcycle) and motorcycle helmets may have to be worn.[14]

  If you keep reading the NM statutes, you see no exceptions to the traffic laws for mopeds. You get to ride with no registration, but you don’t get to ride any way you please. “Bicycles” have to obey the traffic laws too, by the way.  Similar to Texas, lights at night, stop at the stop sign, ride on the right side of the road, obey speed limits, etc.

Photo: This typical electric bicycle, a Sanyo Eneloop (now discontinued), had a range of about 30–55 km (17–35 miles) and a top speed of around 24 km/h (15 mph). Note the 250-watt hub motor on the front wheel and the 5.7Ah lithium-ion battery pack (black, marked “Sanyo,” just in front of the back wheel). Picture by kind permission and courtesy of Richard Masoner, published on Flickr under a Creative Commons (CC BY-SA 2.0) licence.

“There’s tremendous opportunity to get a generation of people for whom suffering isn’t their thing,” Cocalis said. “Ebike riders get the enjoyable part of cycling without the massive suffering of climbing huge hills.”

S-Pedelecs: have pedal-assist only, motor power can be greater than 250 watts, can attain a higher speed (e.g., 45 km/h) before motor stops assisting, legally classed as a moped or motorcycle (not a bicycle)

Controllers for brushed motors: Brushed motors are also used in e-bikes but are becoming less common due to their intrinsic lower efficiency. Controllers for brushed motors however are much simpler and cheaper due to the fact they don’t require hall sensor feedback and are typically designed to be open-loop controllers. Some controllers can handle multiple voltages.

[…] allows you to set the desired parameters and ride the bike the way you want it. There’s also a Pedal Assist Mode that keeps the motor engaged while you’re pedaling. Speaking of the motor, it’s 48 volts and […]

    Electric bikes and E-bike kits (bikes with electric conversion kits) are part of a wide range of Light Electric Vehicles (LEVs) that provide convenient local transportation. Generally designed for one person and small cargo capacity, electric bike range, speed, and cost are moderate. For most of us, the majority of our trips are less than 20 miles – within the range of most e-bikes considering the latest advances in affordable lithium batteries. Clean, quiet, and efficient LEVs offer the advantages of an extra car without the burdens.

Your best approach is to go directly to your states motor vehicle department website, and get a copy of the your local state vehicle codes, with NO EDITING.  Only a recently updated official state vehicle codes will contain all the latest changes to the laws. Other websites may have edited versions of the state codes, which may not contain the sections that apply to e-bikes.  Or the version may simply be out of date.  Even at the official state websites, you might not be getting all the information at once.  Various laws that apply to your e-bike are usually scattered in different sections of the code.

We also crossed the 1kWh barrier by combining it with 21 Ah capacity. This is 95% more range than the standard e-bike battery. We added real-time GPS tracking and topped it off with a 8A fast charger capable of special programmable charging protocols that allow for over 1,500 recharge cycles to be extracted from your lithium battery.

Our E-Mountain Bikes give you the power to ride more trails. And with silent, pedal-assisted power to the pedals and proprietary technologies that would make a Silicon Valley engineer blush, we’re taking your trail rides to new heights…and more thrilling descents.