Established bike companies and startups are embracing ebikes to meet demand. About 34 million ebikes were sold worldwide in 2017, according to data from eCycleElectric Consultants. Most were sold in Europe and China, where the bikes already have exploded in popularity. In 2017, the U.S. market grew to 263,000 bikes, a 25% gain from the prior year.

The Stromer ST1 Platinum may look less decked out than the other models, but this e-bike is pretty high-tech. It looks like something a Storm Trooper might pilot and has a futuristic computer readout to go with it—showing speed, odometer, trip time, and battery level, among other things. The battery is built into the down tube, and the speed tops out at 28 miles per hour. It also has fender and rack mounts if you want to make it a great commuter bike in the winter and can go up to 55 miles on a single charge.

And motorcycle looking contraptions such at the Hanebrink Hustler (read article) which looks like a motorcycle and is 60-MPH  fast…will get you pulled over…even if it has pedals hidden under those fairings:

GenZe e-bikes allow you the flexibility to throttle, get a boost, or pedal on your own. This allows you to move at your pace, and match the speed of traffic. Stopping doesn’t slow you down, and you’ll feel safer and more confident on the road.

Looking in from the outside, this seems completely insane to me. I can’t get my head around the idea a country (or group of countries) that doesn’t have a single definition and set of laws for types of motor vehicles. So where’s the trade body working to get this mess rationalised? How does the bicycle industry ever hope to expand the E-Bike market if the rules are different in every state and even city and town? There’s a ot of money to be from consistency and standardisation.

Batteries: Battery packs can be fitted in all kinds of different positions, but often, they are fixed to a rack behind the rider. If you plan on carrying anything, this configuration could be problematic.

You should never make a “high speed pass” period. If the person you are passing steps in front of you, or serves becuase they don’t know you are there, and you can’t stop and prevent an accident, you have failed to do your job as a responsible citizen. When you pass a person, or another bike on a trail, slow down to near their speed before you pass them — don’t just go zipping past them at 25 mph because you can. That’s exactly the type of behavior that will get eBikes outlawed from bike trails. You are not doing any of us a service by making “high speed passes”.

The Haibike Urban Plus 2017 is made for the city, this 28 mph eBikes are ideal for escaping city traffic on bike paths. It features the all-new TranzX M25, It has shift detection which allows you to shift normally, your chain and sprockets will have more lifespan.

One of the only full suspension electric cargo bikes I’ve tested, the suspension is adjustable and provides a lot of comfort to you and your cargo when paired with the premium Schwalbe tires. Excellent safety features including integrated LED lights, the headlight points where you steer and has……

Build Your Own Electric Bicycle by Matthew Slinn. TAB Green Guru Guides/McGraw-Hill, 2010. Introduces electric bikes and their benefits, discusses safety and legal issues, then goes on to explain how to build a bike with a hub motor kit. Also covers repair, maintenance, and more advanced projects.

A fun, classic looking electrified tricycle designed for adults, it’s easy to mount, stable to ride and very adjustable in terms of speed and power, (go from 3 mph to 14 mph or slow reverse). Includes a rubber-coated metal basket that’s perfect for storing groceries, supplies or the included charger……

“RCW 46.04.169) “Electric-assisted bicycle” means a bicycle with two or three wheels, a saddle, fully operative pedals for human propulsion, and an electric motor. The electric-assisted bicycle’s electric motor must have a power output of no more than one thousand watts, be incapable of propelling the device at a speed of more than twenty miles per hour on level ground, and be incapable of further increasing the speed of the device when human power alone is used to propel the device beyond twenty miles per hour.”

 In this section, we see the requirements for drivers licences for various vehicles. The the one to take note of here is that if you operate as a “moped” (30-MPH) then you need not only a drivers license, but one with a motorcycle endorsement.  But as a motorized bicycle, (20-MPH) you do not need any drivers license.  You only need to be 16 years old for the “bike”.

This all-black e-bike looks futuristic in design, from the handlebars to the Shimano Alfine drivetrain, and its tech is pretty far ahead, too. This Contro-E has Cannondale’s classic Lefty fork (a rigid one) and 2.35-inch Schwalbe tires hefty enough to do urban battle with potholes and the occasional shards of glass. Full front and rear fenders make it a rainy day machine, and a Bosch engine gives you a bit of boost when your morning coffee hasn’t yet kicked in during your commute. 

Samsung’s new flagship phone comes in two sizes, both with powerful cameras that do more than take pretty pictures. WSJ’s David Pierce checked it out before its global launch. Photo/Video: Emily Prapuolenis/The Wall Street Journal

The e-JOE Epik’s thumb throttle is not the most intuitive (it’s a bit like some powered lawn mowers), but you soon get used to it. The handlebar-mounted display could be easier to understand. These minor negatives aside, owners love the e-JOE Epik’s practicality and reliability. It delivers precisely what you expect from a folding electric bicycle.

Electric bikes are a green alternative to driving a vehicle. Studies carried out in several towns and cities show that the average car speed in rush hour traffic can dip as low as 18 to 20 mph. Electric bike speed can be as high as 15 mph. With an electric bike, you can reduce pollution, improve fitness, and still arrive at the same time as your car-bound colleagues.

We drew from 8 years of e-bike manufacturing experience to conceive the most complete commuter e-bike possible. On top of this, we optimized every aspect of our operation to bring this product to market at an affordable price.

In a parallel hybrid motorized bicycle, such as the aforementioned 1897 invention by Hosea W. Libbey, human and motor inputs are mechanically coupled either in the bottom bracket, the rear wheel, or the front wheel, whereas in a (mechanical) series hybrid cycle, the human and motor inputs are coupled through differential gearing. In an (electronic) series hybrid cycle, human power is converted into electricity and is fed directly into the motor and mostly additional electricity is supplied from a battery.

This is the half grip twist throttle on the eFlow E3 Nitro electric bike.  The throttle is engaged by twisting the throttle; similar to a motorcycle or scooter.  This is the most common type of e-bike throttle.

Lower the voltage.  Depending on the battery, the first block or two of riding might do the trick.  If your battery drops voltage fast, you might be a lot slower than 20-MPH for 98% of your ride. I’d call that close enough if that is the case.  Or maybe I can just charge my battery to a lower voltage.  Maybe if I charge it to 40 volts instead of the normal 42V-44V, I won’t be quite so fast.  That could work if my battery still gets me going 23-MPH for too long to fudge it.

The top three e-bikes are the Gocycle GS, The Jetson Adventure, and the Propella E-Bike. All three e-bikes are very different. The Gocycle is futuristic and looks like someone in SoHo, NYC or in Silverlake, Los Angeles would ride it to a trendy shop. It does it in style, won’t force you to relearn how to ride a bike, and certainly has a unique look going for it.

By 1898 a rear-wheel drive electric bicycle, which used a driving belt along the outside edge of the wheel, was patented by Mathew J. Steffens. Also, the 1899 U.S. Patent 627,066 by John Schnepf depicted a rear-wheel friction “roller-wheel” style drive electric bicycle.[7] Schnepf’s invention was later re-examined and expanded in 1969 by G.A. Wood Jr. with his U.S. Patent 3,431,994. Wood’s device used 4 fractional horsepower motors; connected through a series of gears.[8]

Pedal assist, also referred to as pedelec, is a mode that provides power only when you are pedaling.  If you are used to riding a traditional bike, the pedal assist mode has a more intuitive feel compared to the throttle mode.

There are two distinct types of controllers designed to match either a brushed motor or brushless motor. Brushless motors are becoming more common as the cost of controllers continues to decrease. (See the page on DC motors which covers the differences between these two types.)