Bicycle or Motorcycle? It Depends: In 37 US states and Canadian Provinces, e-bikes are considered bicycles—not motorized vehicles. In 29 states and provinces, it’s legal to ride e-bikes on bike paths; in 27 states and provinces, however, you’ll need a license to ride. Where e-bikes are classified as motorcycles, riding on bike paths is illegal. (Seem confusing? People for Bikes has some great online resources to help you familiarize yourself with the rules of the road in your state, like a link to Portland State University’s e-Bike Laws by State and Province.)

We easily rode 30 e-bikes or more this year. Almost all of them impressed us one way or another. Some are expensive and others more affordable. As with most expensive e-bikes, you pay for the difference in quality and feel. But not all entry-level e-bikes have to feel like a cheesy attempt to convert a heavy regular bike with a battery pack and an electric motor.

Jump up ^ Newland, Cameron (September 24, 2015). “IMBA Preliminary Study Results Suggest That Electric Bikes Aren’t Especially Damaging To Mountain Bike Trails”. Overvolted Electric Bike News and Reviews. Retrieved 2015-09-25.

The California section indicates the need for an M-1 or M-2. Not completely correct, if the motorized bicycle, moped, scooter, motorcycle, has 3 wheels (attached sidecar or trike) then a Class C is enough, and no special motorcyle endorsement is needed.

Yes, we offer a 24-month warranty on the battery, and an 18-month/1,800 mile warranty on the parts and frame for the 100 series e-Bikes. For the 200 series, we offer a 2 year warranty on the frame, drivetrain and battery.

The following is an overview of the ShippingPass Pilot subscription service. You should review the Terms & Conditions for a more detailed description as well as service limitations prior to signing up for ShippingPass.

Size: Some electric bikes look a little small, but if you’re going to drive to the edge of the city and ride the last couple of miles, a light, folding model that you can easily throw in the has definite advantages.

China’s experience, as the leading e-bike world market, has raised concerns about road traffic safety and several cities have considered banning them from bicycle lanes.[2] As the number of e-bikes increased and more powerful motors are used, capable of reaching up to 30 miles per hour (48 km/h), the number of traffic accidents have risen significantly in China. E-bike riders are more likely than a car driver to be killed or injured in a collision, and because e-bikers use conventional bicycle lanes they mix with slower-moving bicycles and pedestrians, increasing the risk of traffic collisions.[2]

Our job is to make sure you enjoy your EVELO for many years to come. That’s why they are backed by a 4-year/20,000-mile warranty – double the industry average. If a problem comes up, you are just one call away from our U.S.-based customer service. Combined with our network of partner bike shops around the country for on-the-ground support, you are covered for anything a bike path can throw at you.

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A lot of pedal assist bikes have different levels of assistance, for example: low, medium, or high assist.  Please note that some e-bikes have 4 or 5 pedal assist settings, but for this example we will just stick with low, medium, and high.

HR-727 amended the Consumer Product Safety Act, which falls under Title 15 of the United States Code, which is overall entitled “Commerce and Trade” – so it’s very clear from the context that the federal definition of “low speed electric bicycle” is intended to pertain only to commerce and trade (i.e., importing and selling) of e-bikes. HR-727 was intended to place e-bikes under the jurisdiction of the Consumer Product Safety Commission when it comes to establishing safety requirements for e-bikes imported and sold in the U.S. (as opposed to DOT or NHTSA, which handle such requirements for motor vehicles like cars and trucks). Federal law says nothing about where and how e-bikes may be ridden, thus allowing states and local jurisdictions to set their own rules.