Do you love vintage motorcycles? Then we have the e-bike for you! The Italjet Ascot is a gorgeously classy model, with retro-chic styling that includes leather handlebar tape, a built-in storage bag, and brown bubble tires. Still not enough glamour for you? A gold chain completes the package. Naturally, it has a leather Brooks Flyer saddle, too. Even the lights look vintage, but nothing about how this bike handles makes it feel old. It can get up to 15 miles per hour with the help of the battery—the rest is all your leg power. If you always wanted a Vespa but couldn’t justify a full-blown scooter, this is one step cooler. 

[…] allows you to set the desired parameters and ride the bike the way you want it. There’s also a Pedal Assist Mode that keeps the motor engaged while you’re pedaling. Speaking of the motor, it’s 48 volts and […]

Power-assist: Also known as pedal-assist bikes, these are the bicycle equivalents of hybrid cars: they’re designed to be pedaled quite a lot of the time and electrically powered either when you’re tired or when you feel like a bit of electric help (when you’re going up hill, for example). Unlike full-power bikes, they don’t have hub motors; instead, there’s a separate electric motor mounted near the rear wheel and driving it either through the gear sprocket or simply by pressing against the rear tire. Where a hub motor is difficult or impossible to pedal without any power (because you’re effectively turning it into a generator), power-assist motors turn easily with little or no resistance when you pedal. That gives power-assist bikes much greater range than hub-motor ones (as much as 80–145km or 50–90 miles).

Vintage Electric offers a few e-bike options for getting around California, and for its latest ride it has enlisted one the Golden State’s most iconic figures. The Jeff Clark Signature Cruz has the legend’s fingerprints all over it, and offers fellow surfers a stylish way to cruise to the beach.

By 2007 e-bikes were thought to make up 10 to 20 percent of all two-wheeled vehicles on the streets of many major Chinese cities.[10] A typical unit requires 8 hours to charge the battery, which provides the range of 25 to 30 miles (40 to 48 km),[10] at the speed of around 20 km/h.[11]

This lightweight geared hub motor has a 5:1 gear reduction for increased torque. The freewheeling clutch allows the wheel to spin freely when the motor is not powered. The motor is set up with a high-end 9 Speed Shimano Cassette rather than the budget 7 speed freewheel systems. This insures more crisp gear shifts and even compatibility with 10 Speed setups

Using the throttle only, GenZe e-bikes will go about 20 miles per charge. With pedal assist, the range extends to 20-40 miles per charge. Range is affected by the weight of the rider, the type of terrain, and frequent stops and starts. Did you know that the average commute is less than 8 miles a day?

The situation in New York State is not as bleak as you imply. New York State has yet to define what an electric bike is, so in the meantime the federal definition applies (an ebike goes less than 20mph, with less than 750 watts of power). The federal definition says that any bicycle within these specifications is not a “motor vehicle” or a “motorized vehicle” or a “motorized bicycle”; it is essentially a bicycle. Only state laws for bicycles apply. This makes sense: the intent of the federal law was to define a reasonable speed and power for ebikes that isn’t significantly different from human power. We’re talking about a vehicle that by definition is not capable of behaving significantly differently than a human-powered bicycle, so it should have the same benefits and restrictions as a human-powered bicycle. States like New York State that simply don’t define ebikes don’t have a basis for restricting them, except by referring to the federal law. It may be that this very clear idea needs to be tested in court, or it may be that Albany comes to its senses and passes a legal definition of ebikes similar to the Federal definition.

In a friction drive motor, a small, solid wheel rotates against the side of the tire in order to drive it. The first motorcycles used the same concept, with a motor mounted above the front wheel. The problem is that the drive rubs at the side of the tire. It’s inefficient, and it quickly wears the sidewall away. Tires need to be replaced every couple hundred miles. For this reason, you’ll seldom see electric bikes with this type of drive anymore.

Alec wants your wheels to be strong and true when they leave our doors, and a well-built wheel will stay that way for years.  Alec would rather be outdoors, but he comes in to E-BikeKit each day to make sure that you’ve got what you need to make your own outdoor adventures happen. A day when Alec can keep you rolling down the road and enjoying your bike is a…

This Electric Bicycle kit includes everything needed(except battery) to convert your standard bike into a top-of-the-line performance electric bike. Crank speed sensor for pedal assist. 36 V 500 W super power brushless gearless hub motor.

The Loft™ Go! is perfect for the urban commuter who wants to get around town or to and from work in style with amazing ease. This pedal-assist e-bike is powered by the Bosch Active System and is built to handle the rigors of city streets. 

“It’s happening in every major city, and a lot of secondary cities around the country, and it’s causing people to think differently about getting around on two wheels,” says Pizzi. “If you don’t have safe infrastructure, people don’t feel as if biking is safe and secure.”

One of the most powerful, fastest accelerating, quietest, and beautifully designed electric bikes I have ever tested, premium drivetrain and custom battery. Surprisingly lightweight and well balanced front to rear considering the large 750 watt hub motor,……

This step-through frame will make your commuting life or weekend errands infinitely easier, with speeds of up to 20 miles per hour and an electric assist motor that will power you for up to 50 miles. The Evo Eco Lite rides smoothly and handles like a normal bike—and looks like one too, thanks to careful battery and motor placement. Front and rear fenders plus a rear rack make it easy to ride to work, the library, or the grocery store. It has a simple app to go with it, but you can upgrade to the Premium app, or add a GPS Tracker, a winter battery cover (for snowier climates), or a lighting cable as extras.

When you purchase ShippingPass you don’t have to worry about minimum order requirements or shipping distance. No matter how small the order or how far it needs to go, ShippingPass provides unlimited nationwide shipping. If you need to return or exchange an item you can send it back at no cost or take it to your neighborhood store.

An e-bike conforming to these conditions is considered to be a pedelec in the EU and is legally classed as a bicycle. The EN15194 standard is valid across the whole of the EU and has also been adopted by some non-EU European nations and also some jurisdictions outside of Europe (such as the state of Victoria in Australia).[13]

Baby boomers are an obvious market for electric bicycles. “We’re seeing an aging population, and a growing number of people getting back into cycling,” says Bill Moore, an Internet publisher who recently launched ePEDALER, an electric-assist bicycle retailer. Urbanization will be another driver of electric bike sales, Moore said, as will the obesity crisis, rising health care costs, and the desires of employers to encourage their workers to become more active.

If the individual is under 21 years of age, mandatory successful completion of a Basic Rider education course approved by the CHP is required, such as the Basic Rider course available through the California Motorcyclist Safety Program.

  So what is my example e-bike in California?  Looking at the section for motorized bicycle, it’s less than 1000W, check.  It’s capable of 23-MPH, fail.  We talked earlier about how to make it pass in Texas, and the same things could get it to pass in California. But the last one is new, “Incapable of increasing the speed past 20-MPH…”  What does that mean?  It does not seem me that it means you can’t motor to 20-MPH, then pedal to go faster.  It’s the opposite.  It means that if you pedal to 20-MPH, the motor won’t add any more speed than you have from pedaling. The example e-bike does not do that, so check.

With clear rules on how and where to ride an e-bike, everyone stands to benefit. Local bicycle shops and manufacturers will see increased business and their customers will no longer be confused; people who already ride e-bikes can more easily understand where to ride; and new bicyclists who may be discouraged from riding a traditional bicycle due to limited physical fitness, age, disability or convenience will have new transportation alternatives.

Controllers for brushless motors: E-bikes require high initial torque and therefore models that use brushless motors typically have Hall sensor commutation for speed and angle measurement. An electronic controller provides assistance as a function of the sensor inputs, the vehicle speed and the required force. The controllers generally allow input by means of potentiometer or Hall Effect twist grip (or thumb-operated lever throttle), closed-loop speed control for precise speed regulation, protection logic for over-voltage, over-current and thermal protection. Bikes with a pedal assist function typically have a disc on the crank shaft featuring a ring of magnets coupled with a Hall sensor giving rise to a series of pulses, the frequency of which is proportional to pedaling speed. The controller uses pulse width modulation to regulate the power to the motor. Sometimes support is provided for regenerative braking but infrequent braking and the low mass of bicycles limits recovered energy. An implementation is described in an application note for a 200 W, 24 V Brushless DC (BLDC) motor.[44]

A high-speed, feature complete, value priced electric bike that comes in four frame sizes, high-step and mid-step frame style, and three colors. Relatively comfortable thanks to fatter tires, a suspension fork with compression slider and lockout, Velo……

“The U.S. electric bicycle market is growing, and we see an opportunity for Yamaha to enter with our long history of power assist bicycle innovation,” said Rob Trester, a business development executive with the company. “Yamaha has been studying the market closely, and we see a strong growth trend.”

In the 1890s, electric bicycles were documented within various U.S. patents. For example, on 31 December 1895, Ogden Bolton Jr. was granted U.S. Patent 552,271 for a battery-powered bicycle with “6-pole brush-and-commutator direct current (DC) hub motor mounted in the rear wheel.” There were no gears and the motor could draw up to 100 amperes (A) from a 10-volt battery.[5]