Photo: Zap Electric’s power-assist kit turns a conventional bike into an electric one. There’s a bolt-on DC electric motor (weighing just over 3kg or 7lb) just above the back wheel, behind the police officer’s foot, pressing against the tire and driving it by simple friction. The motor’s powered by a compact lead-acid battery (weighing about 5.5 kg or 12 lb) inside a protective nylon bag. This kit adds quite bit of weight to the bike, but gives extra range and speed when needed. Photo taken in Santa Rosa, California courtesy of US DOE/NREL.

A letter from Casey Evans to Electric Bike Technologies, makers of the E-BikeKit™ electric bike conversion kit system. This one of kind adaptive electric stroller was designed by students from California State University-Sacramento using two 500w direct-drive hub motors controlled by a single E-BikeKit system. Thank you for enabling me to take my daughter hiking! My name is Casey Evans and my daughter, Montel, was born with a very rare…

Fat-tire bikes with powerful electric assist are a match made in heaven. Juiced Bikes says it’s pulled out all the stops to make its upcoming RipCurrent S “the ultimate fat tire commuter e-bike,” and for the price, it looks like the team has pulled off something pretty special.

While some companies are emphasizing the practical benefits of electric bikes — they’re good for your health, good for the planet and a low-cost way to get from here to there — others focus on fun and style. They are targeting urban buyers in their 20s and 30s, without a lot of money to spend, for whom the allure of owning a car has diminished.

“This is the beginning of a multi-year shift away from regular pedal to electric bikes,” Jump Bikes CEO Ryan Rzepecki told CNN Tech. “When people first jump on an ebike, their face lights up. It’s exciting and joyful in a way that you don’t get from a regular bike.”

In the 1890s, electric bicycles were documented within various U.S. patents. For example, on 31 December 1895, Ogden Bolton Jr. was granted U.S. Patent 552,271 for a battery-powered bicycle with “6-pole brush-and-commutator direct current (DC) hub motor mounted in the rear wheel.” There were no gears and the motor could draw up to 100 amperes (A) from a 10-volt battery.[5]

“You honestly feel like you’re floating,” said Marino, who found pedaling easy for his recovering leg. “I felt like I was riding horses again. Instead of trails, I was road biking in and out of traffic.”

This past July 1st we moved our location to Croydon, PA and doubled our space. Additionally we’re looking to hire at least 2 additional employees! This is all to support our expanding conversion kit business and to support some new business we have planned starting in September (more to come on that soon). We would like to thank every single one of our customers, partners, associates and fans for your…

The time or distance an electric bike battery will run between chargings is impossible to judge with much accuracy. There are too many variables: terrain, speed, rider weight, bike load (shopping, kids, luggage), and more. However, we can make a few generalizations about an e-bike’s recharge time and overall working life. These generalizations should be used for comparison purposes only.

The industry is benefiting from improved batteries as suppliers over the years developed technology for laptops, smartphones and electric cars. In 2004, lithium ion battery prices fell low enough to be used on electric bikes, spurring European sales, according to Edward Benjamin, senior managing director at eCycleElectric Consulting.

Bicycle or Motorcycle? It Depends: In 37 US states and Canadian Provinces, e-bikes are considered bicycles—not motorized vehicles. In 29 states and provinces, it’s legal to ride e-bikes on bike paths; in 27 states and provinces, however, you’ll need a license to ride. Where e-bikes are classified as motorcycles, riding on bike paths is illegal. (Seem confusing? People for Bikes has some great online resources to help you familiarize yourself with the rules of the road in your state, like a link to Portland State University’s e-Bike Laws by State and Province.)

This all-black e-bike looks futuristic in design, from the handlebars to the Shimano Alfine drivetrain, and its tech is pretty far ahead, too. This Contro-E has Cannondale’s classic Lefty fork (a rigid one) and 2.35-inch Schwalbe tires hefty enough to do urban battle with potholes and the occasional shards of glass. Full front and rear fenders make it a rainy day machine, and a Bosch engine gives you a bit of boost when your morning coffee hasn’t yet kicked in during your commute. 

Folding Electric Bikes- These are mostly used when people need to combine different modes of transport. For example, if you need first to take the train or bus, a folding e-bike be useful to carry along. Also, very short trips are more convenient with these electric bikes since you don’t need to bother tying them up. Typically, these are very light, even with the motor and battery.

But lower cost options are emerging, too. This month, three U.S. bikeshare companies, Motivate, LimeBike and Spin, announced electric bicycles will be added to their fleets. New York-based Jump Bikes is already operating an electric bikeshare in Washington, D.C., and is launching in San Francisco Thursday. Rides cost $2 for 30 minutes.

“We want our bike to be a sexy product, one that everyone will want,” says Daniel Del Aguila, a co-founder of Prodeco Technologies, which is about to open a new factory near Fort Lauderdale. By squeezing efficiencies out of its supply chain, Prodeco sells a number of models for $1,000 to $1,500 that, Del Aguila contends, compare favorably to bikes selling for $2,000 or more.

Electric bicycles are already popular in Europe and in China, which has more e-bikes than cars on its roads. Now, manufacturers are marketing e-bikes in the U.S., promoting them as a “green” alternative to driving.