It’s what’s inside your motor that sets it apart from the rest. Quality parts and assembly We’ve written here before about how to choose a motor, the different types of motors, the performance differences between motors, etc. But today I want to show you what makes our motors different from other hub motors. Today, harry is replacing the axle on a customer’s direct-drive motor. The bike was crashed and the…

E-bikes are classed according to power that their electric motor can deliver and the control system, i.e., when and how the power from the motor is applied. Also the classification of e-bikes is complicated as much of the definition is due to legal reasons of what constitutes a bicycle and what constitutes a moped or motorcycle. As such, the classification of these e-bikes varies greatly across countries and local jurisdictions.

The Easy Motion Big Bud Pro left a fun impression on us. What’s not to like about those chubby fat tires with two electric motors, one in the back and front? Sporting a 350W electric motor in the back and 250W on the front wheel, this was one fun bike to ride. Why two electric motors on an e-bike? Frankly said, it’s not that much different for everyday riding, but the e-bike came alive on gravel and sandy paths. We can only imagine what a little snow and ice would do to raise our adrenaline past the point of silliness. You can read EBR’s excellent review of it here.

A folding electric bike designed to be durable and water resistant, cast rims can handle more weight and won’t go out of true, stainless steel hardware won’t rust. Feature complete with fenders, a sturdy rear rack, larger reflective tires and LED lights, you……

Free to Roam the Road: According to California state law, any pedal-driven e-bike with a max speed of 20 mph can use any of the state’s bike lanes, bike paths, bike trails or off-street bikeways. (E-bikes are still pretty new, so in many areas, the CA law is the accepted standard in absence of local regulations.) 

 In this section, we see the requirements for drivers licences for various vehicles. The the one to take note of here is that if you operate as a “moped” (30-MPH) then you need not only a drivers license, but one with a motorcycle endorsement.  But as a motorized bicycle, (20-MPH) you do not need any drivers license.  You only need to be 16 years old for the “bike”.

Automated Transit Networks (ATN), and the small-vehicle subset of Personal Rapid Transit (PRT), are emerging technologies that can help solve the related problems of congestion, dependence on foreign oil, and planetary climate disruption. ATN/PRT offers clean, quiet, responsive public transit with automated non-stop service available 24 hours a day. In addition to these service benefits, PRT costs far less to build and operate than other transit options ¯ and is safer than walking and cycling on nearby busy streets.

Most consumers want an e-bike that will accommodate its motor without being too cumbersome and will remain stable in spite of its electronic components. Some consumers want only the most basic of e-bike features, including lights, a cargo rack/basket, and a water bottle holder. Others are focused more heavily on safety features, such as brake type. And still others are concerned with convenience and portability.

I bought an OutlawSS which tops out at 28mph. I tried the “discreet” route as stated above but because of the blood-red color and design of the bike I attracted too much attention. It didn’t matter that I was keeping my (alongside of the road) speed at 15mph, people (probably cycling enthusiasts or just haters) jammed on the brakes to check out wtf I was riding. One passenger (some teenager) even had his smartphone out and was either snapping pictures or getting video. Long story short, the officer that pulled me over said “no” to the bike and advised me to get an off-road sticker from the DNR and I’d be fine on ATV trails. He also said there have been numerous reports of “The guy on the illegal E-bike”. I was polite and got off with a warning. Haters gonna hate I guess.

The most influential definition which distinguishes which e-bikes are pedelecs and which are not, comes from the EU. From the EU directive (EN15194 standard) for motor vehicles, a bicycle is considered a pedelec if:

Jump up ^ European standard NF EN 15194 for Electrically power assisted cycles Archived 2012-12-24 at the Wayback Machine. section Requirements: The maximum [assisted] speed [is] 25 km/h (…) During a production conformity check, the maximum speed may differ by ± 10% from the above-mentioned determined value.

Some e-bikes have an electric motor that operates on a power-on-demand basis only. In this case, the electric motor is engaged and operated manually using a throttle, which is usually on the handgrip just like the ones on a motorbike or scooter. These sorts of e-bikes often, but not always, have more powerful motors than pedelecs do.